Where to stay in the Brecon Beacons for good food, walks and local festivals

Advice

These are unusual times, and the state of affairs can change quickly. Please check the latest travel guidance before making your journey. Our writers visited these hotels pre-pandemic.

The Brecon Beacons National Park may be less explored than Snowdonia, its North Wales rival, but it’s no less rewarding. Think rugged walking trails, picture-postcard villages, and a landscape piled with hearty local produce to discover. It’s also home to a major book-town festival and an International Dark Sky Reserve for pollution-free stargazing. The latter is perfect for glampers, but the region also has a host of infinitely smarter stays, including both foodie and country retreats. Here’s our pick of where to stay in the glorious Brecon Beacons.

Gliffaes Country House Hotel

Brecon Beacons, Wales

9
Telegraph expert rating

This grand, family-run, country retreat near Crickhowell is a superb base for rural pursuits. It’s family-friendly, too, with early suppers for children leaving parents to enjoy locally sourced cuisine from head chef Karl Cheetham at dinner. Equally appetising is the landscape with both a fly-fishing stretch of River Usk and an expanding 19th-century arboretum. The rooms embody the country-house chic style, featuring a collection of contemporary Welsh art. Afternoon tea (£22), served on the terrace or in the conservatory, is the cherry on top.


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From


£
149

per night

Rates provided by
Booking.com

The Angel Hotel

Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales

8
Telegraph expert rating

If you’re heading to The Abergavenny Food Festival (back this year, September 18-19), then book ahead for The Angel. It’s the tastebud-tickling hub of the festival action and a gateway to the national park from the Welsh border. There are 35 elegant rooms, plus a couple of cottages, and plenty of foodie options including the Foxhunter Bar for local ales and Wedgewood Room for afternoon tea (£34). For a hands-on Beacons experience, try a day-course collaboration with the nearby Nant-y-Bedd Gardens in the Black Mountains.


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The Bear Hotel

Crickhowell, Powys, Wales

8
Telegraph expert rating

With its traditional oak beams and long-standing reputation for hospitality at the heart of the Beacons landscape, The Bear positively heaves with history and is a good base for walkers scaling Pen Y Fan or visiting for the annual Crickhowell Walking Festival.
The gloriously unpretentious pub offers 35 romantic and characterful rooms, rambling nooks and crannies for a pint of Brecon Gold, and traditional pub food with a local twist, including matured Welsh steaks from the local butcher and fresh Usk Valley fish.


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From


£
129

per night

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The Walnut Tree Inn

Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales

9
Telegraph expert rating

This is the region’s ultimate foodie escape. Run by the same family as the Angel Hotel, the wonderfully rural and understated inn remains the long-standing home of chef Shaun Hill, who continues to work his Michelin-starred magic with a creative take in a bistro setting. Accommodation is found in the two adjoining cottages, part of Caradog Cottages, with a third in a nearby village. Expect views of Skirrid, homely Welsh-textile throws, and well-stocked kitchens for breakfast goodies. Look out for visiting exhibitions from the sister-business art shop in nearby Abergavenny.


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From


£
100

per night

The Swan at Hay

Hay-on-Wye, Powys, Wales

8
Telegraph expert rating

Bibliophiles love this reimagined historic coaching inn, located on the fringe of the original book town, which is ideal for ‘Woodstock of the Mind’ festival goers. Expect lots of nice local touches — from botanic works by a local artist in the 19 rooms, to tempting regional produce for dinner or Sunday lunch. The Garden Room is a tasteful, light-filled dining room but the real favourite is The Garden, a tranquil terrace for a pint of Butty Bach and casual dining amid the fruit trees, the tinkling River Wye catching on the breeze in view.


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From


£
115

per night

Rates provided by
Booking.com

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